But what kind of problem does the account have?

It’s easy to have problems with an account. Sometimes it’s the fault of the sales rep. Sometimes it’s the fault of the account.

But it’s better to simply say “we have problems.”

Because it really doesn’t matter who’s fault it is. A problem is a problem. The key is to ask what kind of problem there is.

If the buyer at a wine retailer or restaurant doesn’t know what wines you carry, then there’s a marketing problem.

If the buyer at a wine retailer or restaurant doesn’t receive regular emails on updates, out of stocks, new arrivals, and invoices coming due then there’s a systems problem.

If the buyer at a wine retailer or restaurant only sees their sales rep when there’s a fire to put out, or simply randomly, or without an agenda for a meeting, then there’s a planning problem.

If the buyer at a wine retailer or restaurant is tasting your samples, enjoying the wines, making verbal commitments, but not following through then there’s a closing problem.

If a sales rep is showing up with wines but no ability to outline the agenda, shape the conversation, lead the story, and produce sales, then there’s a training problem.

If a sales rep doesn’t really know if she is succeeding, if she doesn’t really know if she’s achieving what is expected, if she doesn’t have a plan and goals, then there’s a sales management problem.

To simply say “I think there’s a problem” is not enough. What kind of problem is it? Then you can solve it.

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